Slavic Myths and Human Monsters

Check out my review of David Demchuk’s “The Bone Mother” originally posted on my other site Speculating Canada. Demchuk’s novel features fairy tales turned dark, highlighting the freakery embodied in folklore

Speculating Canada: Canadian Horror, Science Fiction, and Fantasy

A review of David Demchuk’s The Bone Mother (ChiZine, 2017)
By Derek Newman-Stille

David Demchuk’s The Bone Mother brings together snippets of strange lives into a tale that hints at connections between these individual stories and provides shadows of a larger narrative tying them together. Each of Demchuk’s tales ties in with a snapshot shown at the beginning of the story and diverts into the mythical, magical, mysterious, and monstrous. These images of the normal are interrupted by tales that Other them, transforming them into something complex and uncertain. The unexpected is a stream that runs through Demchuk’s narratives, complicating them to illustrate the way that stories always hold complex truths that are always part fiction.

The Bone Mother features fairy tales turned dark and infused with the mechanical, featuring an ever present factory standing as a symbol of industry intersecting with myth to create a landscape of smoke and…

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An Interview With Chadwick Ginther

Through the Twisted Woods interviews Chadwick Ginther, author of the Thunder Road Trilogy about his reimagining of Norse mythology and a post-ragnarok world. We talk to Chadwick about Norse mythology, Winnipeg, the way that Folklore is both highly regional and yet has the ability to move beyond its original geographic context, superheroes as a modern mythology, mapping folklore onto a Canadian landscape, the endurance of myths, monstrosity, Loki and gender fluidity, Trickster figures, and the ability to map folklore onto modern tales.

Click on the link below for our interview.

Through The Twisted Woods Audio

 

You can discover more about the work of Chadwick Ginther on his website