Fairy Tale Mock Trial

By Derek Newman-Stille

This is an activity I have designed for my Fairy Tale students at Trent University that allows them to explore fairy tale texts in a unique and exciting way, while also developing argumentative skills. The mock trial format allows them to critically interrogate the text and develop arguments from their exploration. I was inspired to develop this activity by watching “How to Get Away With Murder”.

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How to Get Away With Murdering a Fairy Tale Witch: The Trial of Hansel and Gretel

Why a Trial?

It develops several academic skills including:

  • How to create well-structured arguments
  • Augmenting your critical thinking skills
  • How to critically analyze an opposing argument and use evidence to respond to these arguments
  • Oral discussion skills

This type of debate is like scholarship. In academic research, you have to see the points someone else has raised about your topic and create responses to those points that are more persuasive.

The trial will allow you to interact with the text in a unique way, examining it as an evidentiary document. You will find that you remember more about the text.

This is an exploration of active learning since you have to learn on the spot as things are happening around you.

Above all – IT IS FUN!!

 

Instructions:

You will be divided into two groups: the prosecution and defence. It is the job of the prosecution to represent the state and prove that the person or people on trial are guilty. It is the duty of the defence to prove the innocence of the accused person. You will be divided randomly to make this more exciting and to allow you to develop an argument that you may not entirely agree with.

Read through The Grimm Brothers’ “Hansel and Gretel”. Mine this text for evidence of BOTH sides – remember, you will have to think in advance of any arguments the opposing side may come up with and counter them. Ask yourself: What are the details of the case? What could Hansel and Gretel be accused of? Consider what would be compelling arguments to persuade a jury.

Make sure not to speak while the other side is presenting their arguments. Take notes silently and observe so you don’t miss anything.

The Trial

  1. Take 10 minutes to confer with the rest of your legal team and play your case. Each person in the group should contribute. Make sure to take notes while the other side is presenting their case so you can counter them.
  2. Each of you will then have 10 minutes to present their case. Prosecution first, and then defence. Each member of the group should try to make at least one point.
  3. Take 5 minutes to prepare a rebuttal of the opposing team’s statements. Rely on the notes that you took when the opposing team was speaking.
  4. Each of you will then have 10 minutes to present their case. Prosecution first, and then defence. Each member of the group should try to make at least one point.
  5. Your professor will judge the trial and determine the guilt of Hansel and Gretel.

 

 

 

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